Kansas Workforce Initiative

 

The 3 Most Important Things Supervisors Can Do
To Keep Child Welfare Workers on the Job

As child welfare supervisors, you are a critical part of your organization especially in the development and retention of workers who make a difference in the lives of children and families. But what exactly is it that you do as supervisors that contributes to your staff staying on the job and performing successfully?

 

Research has linked three specific supervisor skills to workforce outcomes:  Task Assistance, Social and Emotional Support and Interpersonal Interaction. In these two series of video clips, a real child welfare supervisor demonstrates each of these critical skills. Supervisor Skills I highlights the basic components of each skill while Supervisor Skills II features the same set of skills used in more challenging supervisory situations. Before viewing, you may wish to review Tips for Getting Started Using these Skills.



Supervisor Skills I
Credits

Skill #1:  Task Assistance
Skill #2:  Social and Emotional Support
   

Skill #3 Interpersonal Interaction


 

 



   
   

Supervisor Skills II

Credits
 

Skill #1:  Task Assistance

Skill #2:  Social and Emotional Support

 
Skill #3:  Interpersonal Interaction  

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about how supervision relates to workforce and consumer outcomes, see our Workforce Evidence Reviews.

 


This website was made possible through a cooperative agreement between the University of Kansas School of Social Welfare
and the U.S. DHHS/ACF Children's Bureau, Grant Number 90CT0150. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors
and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Children's Bureau.